Sex and Alcohol

What You Need To Know


  • Large doses of alcohol in females may cause lack of lubrication and lack of orgasm. In males, it can cause difficulties in achieving or maintaining erections.
  • Chronic or continuous alcohol use destroys testosterone in males, causes withering of the testicles, enlargement of male breasts, loss of hair, and impotence.
  • 73.7% of UGA undergraduates have engaged in oral sex; 64.7% of UGA undergraduates have engaged in vaginal sex, and 21.5% have engaged in anal sex.1
  • 42.0% of UGA students said that consuming alcohol prior to sexual activity involves “great risk.”2
  • Of those who drink alcohol, 20.4% of UGA undergraduates reported unprotected sex due to drinking within the last 12 months.3
  • One study of several Virginia universities found that 38% of students said alcohol was linked to an unprotected sexual encounter. Over a third specifically said that they failed to use a condom or other protection because of alcohol.4
  • In the last 12 months, 25.1% of UGA students thought a partner was unattractive because of alcohol or drug use.5
  • Both males and females were 3 to 4 times more likely to use a condom when they reported discussing birth control, HIV, STIs (sexually transmitted infections) or emotional commitment with their partners. Compared to men who reported little or no alcohol use, men who reported consuming more alcohol at their last sexual encounter were 1.5 times more likely not to have discussed these issues.6
  • Frequently drinking enough to get drunk is a main factor that consistently increases the risk of sexual victimization.7 One national study showed that 75% of men and 55% of women involved in acquaintance rapes were drinking or taking drugs just before the incident.8
  • A study at the University of Washington reported that 47% of men and 48% of women stated that alcohol led to a sexual situation that they later regretted.9
  • This same study at UW found that 9% of men and 17% of women indicated that their partner attempted intercourse after giving drugs or alcohol to them.10
  • At UGA, of those individuals who experienced forced sexual touching in the last year, 88.2% had been under the influence of alcohol or drugs.11
  • Also at UGA, of those individuals who experienced unwanted sexual intercourse in the last year, 92.1% had been under the influence of alcohol or drugs.12
  • 4.6% of UGA students have taken advantage of others sexually while under the influence of alcohol.13



References
1. University Health Center. (2003). National College Health Assessment
Survey. Athens GA.
2. University Health Center. (2001). CORE Survey Data for 2001 Executive
Summary. Athens, GA.
3. University Health Center. (2003). National College Health Assessment
Survey. Athens GA.
4. Around the region: College study links alcohol, unsafe sex. (1990,
December 24). Washington Post, p. B5.
5. University Health Center. (2001). CORE Survey Data for 2001 Executive
Summary. Athens, GA.
6. SIECUS (1999, October). Study examines alcohol use, safer sex communication,
and condom use among college students. SHOP Talk Bulletin, 4 (15).
7. Fisher, B.S., Cullen, F.T., & Turner, M.G. (2000). The Sexual Victimization
of College Women. Research Report NCJ 182369; Department of Justice.
8. Warshaw, R. (1994). I Never called it rape. New York: HarperPerennial.
9, Schubert, R. (1999, July). Sexual contact study surprises surveyors.
Seattle-Post-Intelligencer.
10. Ibid.
11. University Health Center. (2001). CORE Survey Data for 2001 Executive
Summary. Athens, GA.
12. Ibid.
13. Ibid.